Friday, December 31, 2010

Faces of MS


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Monday, December 27, 2010

Studies set up to test hotly debated MS theory - Winnipeg Free Press
Canada has one of the highest rates of multiple sclerosis in the world, with about 75,000 people affected by the disease. The MS Society of Canada and the National MS Society in the U.S. have provided more than $2.4 million in funding for seven research projects to examine if a relationship exists between MS and chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency, or CCSVI, as theorized by Dr. Paolo Zamboni. They include: read more

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In centre of 'liberation' storm - Winnipeg Free Press

Heavily censored papers show Oswald well-briefed on contentious issue 

By: Kim Lawson and Tammy Karachuk

At the height of last summer's national debate over the multiple sclerosis "liberation therapy," Manitoba Health Minister Theresa Oswald was being briefed weekly, suggesting the controversial treatment was top-of-mind for the minister.
But the province won't reveal details of the internal debate that prompted Oswald to hold off on clinical trials in Manitoba.

More than half the information in the briefing notes is censored -- in some instances, up to 90 per cent on each page. Still shrouded in secrecy is the government's internal analysis of the issue, including recommendations and cautions from Manitoba's senior health experts.
In an interview, Oswald said she heard from vascular surgeons, doctors from the MS Clinic in Winnipeg, researchers and her own staff, many of whom...read more

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Sunday, December 26, 2010

Map of CanadaImage via Wikipedia
Focus on MS good for patients: advocates | Canada | News | Ottawa Sun
A year of attention on multiple sclerosis and a potential treatment for the degenerative disease has been good for patients, the MS Society and a patient advocate agree.
The controversial CCSVI procedure, also known as the liberation treatment, theoretically unblocks neck veins to ease symptoms.
Last year, Italian doctor Paolo Zamboni pioneered the procedure. The disease was always thought to be a neurological disorder, but Zamboni suggests some of the symptoms could be caused by blocked neck veins. The procedure inserts a stent or uses an angioplasty to unblock them.
A spokesman for the MS Society of Canada says...read more
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Friday, December 24, 2010

An enlargeable topographic map of MexicoImage via Wikipedia
Liberation Treatment improves lives of two young Weyburn women
Story by: Jennifer LaCharite
Thu, Dec 23, 2010
Clark had hoped that the treatment would improve her ability to walk and her poor balance but she is only seeing small improvements on this front, so far. She began physiotherapy upon returning from Mexico to help her walk and, eventually...read more
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Thursday, December 23, 2010

2010: A Year of Significant Progress in MS Research
National MS Society Leads the Way in Cutting Edge Research to Stop MS, Restore Function and End MS Forever

NEW YORK, Dec. 20, 2010 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Exciting advances were made in 2010 in virtually every field of MS research. Progress toward finding new therapies for MS is illustrated by the availability of the first oral disease-modifying therapy for MS. Progress was also made toward finding ways to restore function and improving quality of life and specific MS symptoms through exercise, meditation, rehabilitation and medications, including the first therapy specifically approved to treat a symptom of MS (Ampyra). Our understanding of factors that influence whether a person develops MS deepened this year, bringing us closer to finding ways to prevent the disease.
Read more http://news.yahoo.com/s/usnw/20101220/pl_usnw/DC19769
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Tuesday, December 21, 2010

eclipse flare decemeber 21 2010Image by davedehetre via Flickr
Staying positive while coping with MS
Coping with MS hasn't been easy, but this patient won't let the disease get him down
Read more: http://www.canada.com/health/Staying+positive+while+coping+with/3974260/story.html#ixzz18lix7JWY

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Significant Progress in Multiple Sclerosis Research in 2010

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Significant Progress in Multiple Sclerosis Research in 2010
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Saturday, December 18, 2010

montel williams on a moneymutual.com tv commer...Image by Lisa Padilla via FlickrInteresting video on Montel Williams Web Site
http://montelnetwork.com/#|episode|fs000080000iocr24040000000
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Thursday, December 16, 2010

Province funds study to examine safety of new treatment for MS patients
The province will provide up to $1 million for an observational study that will examine the safety and effects of a new treatment for people with multiple sclerosis (MS).
"This observational study is about obtaining more research to help fill the evidence void that currently exists," said Health Minister Gene Zwozdesky.
The study will essentially be a web-based questionnaire for Albertans who have received treatment for CCSVI in another country, those who are scheduled to receive it and other Albertans with MS. It will be conducted by ...read more http://edmonton.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20101216/edm_treatment_101216/20101216/?hub=EdmontonHome

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Tuesday, December 14, 2010

To view Part 2-14 go to You Tube and type 2010 National Education Series Part 2 etc...

Speakers:
Dr. Virender Bhan, Neurologist and Director, MS Clinic Dalhousie University
Dr. Katherine Knox, Researcher and Director, MS Clinic Saskatoon City Hospital

Moderator:
Jon Temme, Senior Vice-President Research & Programs, MS Society of Canada


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Thursday, December 9, 2010

Plum
Eating purple coloured fruit such as blueberries could help ward off Alzheimer’s, Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson’s because it soaks up harmful iron compounds, new research suggests.
Brightly-coloured fruits and vegetables are excellent sources of chelators, as is green tea, with purple fruits considered to have the best chance of binding the iron effectively.
However, despite conflicting reports, the widely-publicised benefits of red wine seem to...read more

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Tuesday, December 7, 2010

Milk fortified with Vitamin D
Confusing, with a capital D - Winnipeg Free Press
The news is sure to confuse Canadians. Over the past several years, the public has come to regard vitamin D as a way to ward off such diseases, thanks to studies published in reputable science journals and the subsequent news reports. Those headlines have led to a surge in vitamin D supplement sales as well as an increase in patients asking their doctors to test their blood levels for the vitamin.
Meanwhile, the IOM panel -- made up of 14 vitamin D experts from the United States and Canada -- has significantly increased their vitamin D recommendations for healthy adults under age 71 from 200 IU to... read more

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Multiple Sclerosis: T1-weighted MRI (post-cont...Image via Wikipedia
New Possibility of Reversing Damage Caused by Multiple Sclerosis

ScienceDaily (Dec. 6, 2010) — Damage caused by multiple sclerosis could be reversed by activating stem cells that can repair injury in the central nervous system, a study has shown.
Researchers from the Universities of Cambridge and Edinburgh have identified a mechanism essential for regenerating insulating layers -- known as myelin sheaths -- that protect nerve fibres in the brain. In additional studies in rodents, they showed how this mechanism can be exploited to make the brain's own stem cells better able to regenerate new myelin.
In multiple sclerosis, loss of myelin leads to the nerve fibres in the brain becoming damaged. These nerve fibres are important as they send messages to other parts of the body.
The scientists believe that this research will help in identifying...Read More
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Cognitive impact of pediatric multiple sclerosis varies by race, UAB research finds
December 6, 2010
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects some cognitive functions more severely in black children than white children, according to newly published research from an interdisciplinary team at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
The UAB researchers say the study, published in the Dec. 7, 2010, issue of Neurology, is the first to reveal that the severity of cognitive difficulties in pediatric MS may vary between black and white children. The results provide valuable insight that could help individualize treatments for children suffering from the disease.
"We don't yet understand the biological reasons, but the bottom line is treatment options must be re-evaluated and be aggressive enough, especially with black patients, to prolong quality of life for as long as possible," says Kelly Ross, M.A, a psychology doctoral degree candidate in the UAB College of Arts and Sciences and lead author of the study.
MS is a chronic neurological disorder of the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves, which can cause subtle but debilitating impairments in learning and cognition and more apparent disruptions of motor control. Although MS in children is much less common than in adults, the disease may impact cognitive function more in read more

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Despite Multiple SclerosisImage by mtsofan via Flickr
Purdue research finds a clue in the multiple sclerosis puzzle
They found that mice with a similar disease to human multiple sclerosis have elevated levels of acrolein, an environmental toxin found in...Read More http://www.jconline.com/article/20101207/LIFE03/12070301/Purdue-research-finds-a-clue-in-the-multiple-sclerosis-puzzle

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Monday, December 6, 2010

Mouse embryonic stem cells with fluorescent markerImage via Wikipedia
Stem Cell Treatment Holds Promise For MS Patients
A research team at the Cambridge and Edinburgh University has shown that activating stem cells in the brain, specifically the oligodendrocyte precursor cells or OPCs, could reverse the damage caused to the myelin sheath in people affected by the auto immune disease, multiple sclerosis (MS). OPCs are stem cell types that read more http://www.healthaim.com/stem-cell-treatment-holds-promise-for-ms-patients/

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Sunday, December 5, 2010

N.B. 'liberation' MS fund based on politics: expert
The Associated Press
Date: Sunday Dec. 5, 2010 3:20 PM ET
FREDERICTON — A leading authority on multiple sclerosis says a New Brunswick government promise to help patients access so-called "liberation" therapy outside the country is rooted in politics rather than science.
The province's Conservative government says it will set up a $500,000 fund to assist people with MS access the treatment, which has not undergone clinical trials in Canada.
Neurologist Dr. Jock Murray of Dalhousie University in Halifax says read more http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Health/20101205/new-brunswick-liberation-fund-101205/

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Saturday, December 4, 2010

CBC News - North - Yukon joins Sask. for MS therapy trials
Yukon Health Minister Glenn Hart said details of its agreement with Saskatchewan are in development, but he said Yukoners should

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2010/12/03/yukon-sask-ms-therapy-trials.html#ixzz17ABhGuiq


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Friday, December 3, 2010

Three women find hope
Liberation therapy set women free from  
NORTH OAKVILLE TODAY – Three women sat in a North Oakville living room last week enjoying a cup of coffee and talking about what the future holds.
“It’s nice to look forward to the future instead of....read more
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