Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Clinical Trial Testing New Multiple Sclerosis Treatment to Launch in Buffalo

Researchers at the University at Buffalo, led by the Department of Neurosurgery, will embark on a landmark prospective randomized double-blinded study to test the safety and efficacy of interventional endovascular therapy—dubbed “liberation treatment”—on MS symptoms and progression.

(Vocus/PRWEB ) June 28, 2010 -- Recently, chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) has been strongly associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). In a series of original studies, Dr. Paolo Zamboni of the University of Ferrara, Italy demonstrated blockage of major venous outflow from the brain and spinal cord in patients with MS. Researchers from many institutions, including the University at Buffalo, have confirmed the association.

It is hypothesized that the narrowing in the large veins in the neck and chest might cause improper drainage of blood from the brain, resulting in eventual injury to brain tissue. It is thought that angioplasty—a treatment commonly used by cardiologists and other endovascular surgeons to treat atherosclerosis—may remedy the blockages. Dr. Zamboni has further conducted preliminary studies suggesting the efficacy of venous angioplasty (“liberation procedure”) in the amelioration of MS symptoms.

Now, researchers at the University of Buffalo will launch PREMiSe (Prospective Randomized Endovascular therapy in Multiple Sclerosis) to determine if endovascular intervention via balloon angioplasty to correct the blockages improves MS symptoms or progression. PREMiSe is believed to be the first IRB-approved prospective randomized double-blinded study of balloon angioplasty for MS being performed in a rigorous fashion in the US with significant safeguards in place to ensure careful determination of risks and benefits.

The study is being led by principal investigator Dr. Adnan Siddiqui along with co-principal investigators Dr. Elad Levy and Dr. L.N. Hopkins of the University at Buffalo Department of Neurosurgery. Additional independent researchers from University at Buffalo will participate in the evaluation and follow-up of study patients. An independent Data Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) will ensure the safety and effectiveness of the study on an ongoing basis.

In the first phase of the study, ten MS patients from the United States and Canada exhibiting venous insufficiency will undergo minimally invasive venous angioplasties to determine if the procedure can be performed safely. The procedures, scheduled for June 29 and 30, 2010, will be performed by click here to read more

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